Why Single-Stream?

Who will benefit from this new process?

Our Residents: Simply put: No more separating or sorting. And with the process, a wider range of recyclable materials may be picked up together. Individual collection bins will be available for homeowners, while the county's 27 recycling drop-off sites will also continue to operate.

Our Region: Municipalities and partner counties will, in the long run, save money by paying for disposal of less garbage. By shifting the pickup responsibility from the county to private haulers, those areas will also see a more efficient use of taxpayer funds. Single-stream recycling has also been shown to increase participation rates – with some areas more than doubling their volumes.

Haulers: Efforts to introduce single-stream recycling will give haulers of our region a chance to build and expand their markets. Throughout most of the area, consumers will be able to select the waste hauler that best meets their needs for service.

Our Economy: An expanded recycling program has the potential to create new jobs through collecting and processing, and through creating new products from recycled materials. New jobs mean money spent on goods and services, and increased revenue for state and local governments.

Our Environment: The single-stream process is being implemented to extend the longevity of the landfill, and in the long run, conserve our natural resources. Studies have shown that by using more recycled materials in manufacturing, we can reduce global warming pollution by as much as 276 million metric tons in the next 20 years – an amount equal to the emissions of more than 70 coal-fired power plants or around 50 million cars.

Overview of Research Findings

  • Gender

    48% Male

    52% Female

  • Age Range

    28% under 35

    34% 35-55

    38% over 55

  • Important Findings

    78% said it was important to recycle

    76% said they regularly recycle: The top three reasons: helping the environment, saving the cost of waste disposal and reducing landfills

    The main reason for not recycling: lack of a recycling service

    77% pay a trash hauler to pick up their household waste including recyclables

    Respondents indicated they would recycle more frequently if they could put their recyclables into a single bin without sorting

    76% favor single-stream recycling: The main reasons: convenience, easier to recycle, increasing the number of people that recycle, and helping the environment

  • Conclusions

    Lycoming County residents are generally supportive of recycling

    Most recycle for environmental reasons

    Three in four pay for a trash hauler to dispose of their waste

    Reactions to single-stream recycling are positive

    Respondents believe they will recycle more often if single-stream recycling is introduced

    A majority of respondents would switch waste haulers if another waste hauler offered single-stream recycling

How Single-Stream Recycling Works

One For All Single-Stream: Large metering bin is loaded with mixed recyclables at the start of the single-stream system.

Large metering bin is loaded with mixed recyclables at the start of the single-stream system.

One For All Single-Stream: Metering bin and incline conveyor moves materials to pre-sort line.

Metering bin and incline conveyor moves materials to pre-sort line.

One For All Single-Stream: Pre-sort line. Materials too large for the downstream system to process are removed by hand prior to entering the OCC separation screens.

Pre-sort line. Materials too large for the downstream system to process are removed by hand prior to entering the OCC separation screens.

One For All Single-Stream: The first OCC separation screen. All bulky cardboard is removed from the mix at this location and sent to a baler.

The first OCC separation screen. All bulky cardboard is removed from the mix at this location and sent to a baler.

One For All Single-Stream: View of maintenance platforms, which provide access to the equipment.

View of maintenance platforms, which provide access to the equipment.

One For All Single-Stream: A second set of polishing screens continue separating fibers from plastic bottles, tin and aluminum cans, and aseptic containers (paper cartons).

A second set of polishing screens continue separating fibers from plastic bottles, tin and aluminum cans, and aseptic containers (paper cartons).

One For All Single-Stream: Final polishing screens remove any remaining fiber and send it to the fiber sort line.

Final polishing screens remove any remaining fiber and send it to the fiber sort line.

One For All Single-Stream: View of fiber sort line. Recycling staff will sort separated materials into the proper bins at this location.

View of fiber sort line. Recycling staff will sort separated materials into the proper bins at this location.

One For All Single-Stream: Bin where all sorted containers are stored prior to processing through the optical sorters.

Bin where all sorted containers are stored prior to processing through the optical sorters.

One For All Single-Stream: One of four Green Eye optical container sorters used to separate plastic bottles by type; also pictured is the bag vacuum system blower unit.

One of four Green Eye optical container sorters used to separate plastic bottles by type; also pictured is the bag vacuum system blower unit.

One For All Single-Stream: Green Eye high intensity lighting system. Floods the accelerator belt with light enabling vision system to collect the data it needs to fire air jets and remove desired recyclable products.

Green Eye high intensity lighting system. Floods the accelerator belt with light enabling vision system to collect the data it needs to fire air jets and remove desired recyclable products.

One For All Single-Stream: Green Eye Optical Sorting Systems high speed accelerator belt. Travels at 500 feet per minute and evenly disperses material load so that optical sensors can identify isolated containers for sorting.

Green Eye Optical Sorting Systems high speed accelerator belt. Travels at 500 feet per minute and evenly disperses material load so that optical sensors can identify isolated containers for sorting.

Acceptable & Unacceptable Materials

  • Acceptable Materials

    Paper-dry & clean, No bags

    Newspaper & inserts

    Magazines & catalogs

    Junk mail, envelopes, file folders, shredded paper

    Office white, colored and computer paper (staples & paper clips OK)

    Corrugated cardboard boxes

    Cereal & gift boxes (remove liners)

    Paper bags & phone books

    Books

    Containers-empty & clean, No bags

    Aluminum cans (beer & soda)

    Aluminum foil & foil plates, etc.

    Glass bottles & jars (food & drink only)

    #1-#7 Plastics (plastic bottles, jars, tubs and rigid containers: soda, water, milk, juice, liquor, shampoo, detergent, condiments, yogurt, margarine, pet food, clear plastic food containers)

    Metal food cans & lids (tin/steel)

    Metal pots and pans

    Empty aerosol cans

    Cartons

    juice, milk, soup & broth, wine, soy milk

  • Unacceptable Materials

    Drinking glasses

    Mirror, ceramics or Pyrex

    Window glass

    Light bulbs, plates or vases

    Waxed paper

    Waxed cardboard

    Napkins

    Tissues

    Paper towels

    Paper to-go containers

    Stickers or sheet of address labels (affixed address labels and stamps are OK)

    Tyvek envelopes

    Plastic 6-pack holders

    Plastic microwave trays

    Plastics other than those listed on the left

    Styrofoam (including packing peanuts)

    Scrap metal

    Propane tanks

    Needles and/or syringes

    Hazardous or biohazardous waste

    Food waste, garbage

    Hangers

    Electrical cords

    Bubble wrap

    Garden Hoses

Download this list

News

On Thursday, October 16, Lycoming County Resource Management Services celebrated the grand opening of its $5.3 million single-stream recycling facility and the subsequent launch of a new regional recycling program, “One For All.” More than 100 guests toured the facility and heard opening remarks from local and state dignitaries.

One For All Single-Stream: Recycling Markets Center Executive Director Steve Tucker..

Director RMS
Steve Tucker

One For All Single-Stream: LCRMS Resource Recovery Manager Jason Yorks.

LCRMS Resource Recovery
Manager Jason Yorks

One For All Single-Stream: Pre-sort line. Materials too large for the downstream system to process are removed by hand prior to entering the OCC separation screens.

Lycoming County Commissioner
Jeff Wheeland

One For All Single-Stream: Acting Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Dana Aunkst.

Acting Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Protection
Secretary Dana Aunkst

One For All Single-Stream: Robert Bylone, Recycling Markets Center Executive Director.

Robert Bylone, Recycling Markets Center Executive Director

From L to R: Robert Bylone, Recycling Markets Center Executive Director; Steve Tucker, Director, Lycoming County Resource Management Services;  Jason Yorks, LCRMS Resource Recovery Manager; Acting DEP Secretary Dana Aunkst; and Lycoming County Commissioner Jeff Wheeland.

From L to R: Robert Bylone, Recycling Markets Center Executive Director; Steve Tucker, Director, Lycoming County Resource Management Services; Jason Yorks, LCRMS Resource Recovery Manager; Acting DEP Secretary Dana Aunkst; and Lycoming County Commissioner Jeff Wheeland

Jason Yorks, LCRMS Resource Recovery Manager, leads a tour for dignitaries and members of the media. Green Machine supplied all equipment for the new single-stream recycling facility.

Jason Yorks, LCRMS Resource Recovery Manager, leads a tour for dignitaries and members of the media. Green Machine supplied all equipment for the new single-stream recycling facility.

One of several tour groups checks out bales of paper products sorted by the single-stream facility.

One of several tour groups checks out bales of paper products sorted by the single-stream facility.

Participating Waste Haulers

Single-stream recycling curbside pickup service is provided for a fee by private haulers.

Your current waste hauler may offer pickup. If your waste hauler does not provide service to your location, click here for a list of haulers that provide service to your location.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is single-stream recycling?

Simply put: No more separating or sorting. The single-stream process allows you to place all your recyclables in one container.

Why is the “One For All” program being implemented?

We launched the program for several reasons. First, the job of pickup will shift from the county to the hands of private businesses; they’ll do a better job and offer pickup of more than just glass, steel and tin cans. Second, we believe it’s a good thing for the environment. Studies have shown that where single-stream recycling has been introduced, more people will recycle. Finally, we conducted research with our residents, and you told us that you want the convenience and flexibility of single-stream recycling.

What can I recycle?

Paper bags, newspaper and inserts, magazines, catalogs, junk mail, shredded paper, corrugated cardboard, cereal boxes, books and phone books, aluminum cans, aluminum foil, glass bottles and jars, Nos. 1 through 7 plastic (bottles, jars, tubs, detergent, condiments, yogurt, margarine, pet food, clear plastic food containers), tin and steel cans, metal pots and pans, empty aerosol cans, cereal boxes, soda cases, paper towel rolls, and aseptic gable top containers (milk, soup and broth containers).

Is anything unacceptable?

Window glass, drinking glasses, mirrors, ceramics or Pyrex, light bulbs, plates, frozen food containers, waxed paper or waxed cardboard, paper towels, plastic microwave trays, Styrofoam, packing peanuts, propane tanks, pizza boxes, needles or syringes, scrap metal, garbage, electrical cords, garden hoses, hangers, hazardous or biohazardous waste, oil or antifreeze containers, buckets.

Who will be picking up recyclables?

Your current waste hauler may offer pickup. If your waste hauler does not provide service to your location, click here for a list of haulers that provide service to your location.

Will the current drop-off sites remain open?

Yes. For now, all of the county's 27 drop-off sites will continue to operate and remain source-separated.

Where do I get a recycling bin?

You can obtain a 95-gallon bin from your hauler.

What should I do with bulky items or appliances?

Items such as large white goods will still need to be handled as before through your hauler, or you can deliver them to the transfer station or the landfill. “White goods” are another term for appliances and other salvageable materials such as washing machines, dryers, refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, dehumidifiers, dishwashers, hot water heaters, stoves, sheet iron, tin and steel auto parts.

Where do my recyclables go?

They will be taken to the new single-stream recycling facility where they will be sorted, baled and sold on to manufacturers.

Why did a new facility need to be built?

Both the single-stream process and the new facility are being introduced to extend the life of the landfill and conserve our natural resources.